More about Hannover

The new Cluster of Excellence strengthens vulnerable people against infections

RESIST – Research for the Weakest

Why do bacteria and viruses harm some people seriously and hardly affect others? How can infections be better prevented, diagnosed and treated in an individually tailored manner? The scientists and clinicians of the new Cluster of Excellence RESIST want to answer these questions – and thus help people with a weakened immune system. Particularly affected are, for example, newborns and seniors, people with an inborn immunodeficiency and patients whose immune system is suppressed for therapeutic reasons or who are carriers of implants.

Science line: Universities, laboratories, institutes - only one stop away

How Hannover is researching in transdisciplinary terms

Innovative implants are becoming increasingly important. In Hanover, researchers from the fields of medicine, natural sciences, and engineering rely on transdisciplinarity. They join forces to develop safe and infection-resistant cardiovascular, cochlear, orthopaedic, and dental implants. This all takes place along the “Science Line” at the heart of research location Hanover.

Photonics, Optics, and Engineering- Innovation across Disciplines

Cluster of Excellence PhoenixD

Making optical precision instruments quickly and inexpensively using additive production methods such as 3D printing: what sounds like a vision is the aim of the research partnership Phoenix-D. Scientists in mechanical engineering, physics, electrical engineering, computer science and chemistry are working together on the simulation, fabrication and application of optical systems. Up to now, optical glass lenses and the surrounding frames have been made in several stages - often by hand. In the research partnership, experts from a wide range of disciplines are working on a digitalised manufacturing system that can produce individualised products.

Innovative treatment approach for cardiac failure.

MHH Researchers Put an End to Pathological Heart Growth

Heart conditions often have grave consequences. The dangerous process of pathological cardiac remodeling following a heart attack, e.g. is often irreversible. But scientists at MHH have been developing a new treatment option that may slow down or even reverse this process. Sponsored by the REBIRTH excellence cluster, said researchers have discovered a large amount of hitherto unknown ribonucleic acids (RNA) in the pathologically growing myocardial cells. Modulating the production of these RNAs could stop abnormal heart growth.  Professor Dr. Dr. Thomas Thum, Head of the Institute of Molecular and Translational Therapeutic Strategies can tell us more.

How and why are they performed? And what is examined?

Looking into Animals: Necropsies at the TiHo

Veterinary pathologists have varied tasks: they determine the causes of diseases and death in pets, zoo animals, and livestock, and also perform research on the emergence and course of diseases. They acquire their basic skills for this purpose during necropsy exercises in the seventh semester of their veterinary education.Regular necropsies are also performed at the Institute for Terrestrial and Aquatic Wildlife Research (ITAW) at the TiHo in Büsum, for instance in order to determine potential causes of reducing inventories or the stranding of marine mammals. Here you can look over Professor Dr. Ursula Siebert’s shoulder while the Head of the ITAW performs the necropsy of a porpoise.

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Institutions

GISMA Business SchoolHannover Universitiy of Music, Drama and MediaStudentenwerk Hannover Student ServicesHannover Medical SchoolLeibniz University HannoverVolkswagen FoundationCity of HannoverLeibniz School of BusinessUniversity of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, FoundationHochschule Hannover University of Applied Sciences and ArtsFachhochschule für die Wirtschaft University of Applied SciencesFraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicinehannoverimpuls